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An early Saturday baseball history discussion at the Lincoln Log Cabin

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Wrigley Field, home of the Chicago Cubs, has been officially designated a National Historic Landmark. National Historic Landmark sites are those sites “of national importance in American history and culture.” This acknowledges the important role the stadium has played in the city of Chicago and the history of professional sports, US Department of the Interior. The stadium, built in 1914, is the second oldest in Major League Baseball. The oldest is Fenway Park, which became a National Historic Landmark in 2012. Wrigley Field is a special place in the hearts of generations of fans, Tom Ricketts, CEO of the Chicago Cubs


LERNA – Presentations about Early history of baseball In illinois and around vintage baseball play day scheduled for saturday at Lincoln Log Cabin State Historic Site.

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Charleston Tourism/Special Events Supervisor Laurie Henderson said Professor Robert Sampson will discuss his research for his upcoming book, “Ballists, Dead Beats, and Muffins: Inside Early Baseball in Illinois,” at 1 p.m. at the site’s visitor center.

Henderson said Sampson’s show, “The Gentleman’s Endgame: The Growth and Decline of Early Baseball in Illinois,” will provide an activity for families who gather together over the long Thanksgiving weekend.

The description of the presentation notes that baseball in its early years was a game played with hardballs caught without gloves, in which teams posted double-digit hits and inept players willingly adopted the “donut” label.

Between 1865 and 1868 Illinois was ravaged by a swift, but less deadly, outbreak of cholera, drawing hundreds of spectators, men and women, to stadiums roughly divided into vacant lots. Their gathering together during those years was custom and ritual, including elaborate meals and entertainment before and after the match to the visiting teams, encouraging the opponent to play well and never questioning the referee, all designed to calm the competitive spirit.”

Sampson’s presentation will be followed by Michael Griffin, captain of the Summit Station Signalmen Vintage Base Ball Club, to discuss the technical aspects of playing classic baseball today. Griffin is also a member of the Vintage Base Ball Association.

“We’re recreating the game of base ball (two words at the time) as it was played in 1860 and bringing it to the public in a non-competitive, educational and entertaining way,” said Griffin. “I’m trying to bring vintage baseball to Charleston and start a new club based at the Lincoln Log Cabin State Historic Site. I’m in the early stages of recruiting players/actors.”

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