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Dr.. Drew Hart delivers a two-part series during MLK Jr. Day festivities

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Quincy, MA — Eastern Nazarene College (ENC) welcomed Dr. Drew Hart, an accomplished author, activist, and professor, to its annual MLK Jr. Day celebrations.

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The lecture is entitled Wearing Blue Jeans: White Supremacy and the Call to Join God’s Revealed Presenceon January 18 at Ruth Cameron Auditorium. Hart, an expert theologian, begins with a brief history of the church and the atrocities committed in the name of Jesus. He linked the theology that influenced slavery since 1441 to the injustices committed today, inside or outside the church. The lecture emanated from the role of Christianity in marginalization

Dr. Hart offered procedures for the church to emulate King’s mission. He emphasized the importance of sustainable mobilization – a way to organize society, to allow people to use their agency to effect change, and to implement concrete goals to benefit from social change.

Christian institutions are not exempt from excluding diverse viewpoints. Hart has proposed changes that Christian colleges can implement to promote equality and emulate Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Hart maintains that diverse and marginalized voices not only matter at the executive level, such as the board of trustees, but change must flow to the classroom as well. Educators are responsible for defocusing their curriculum, introducing new ideas, including unrepresented voices, and preparing students for activity. For Hart, teaching is an important journey alongside the student, providing guidance, support, and a holistic relationship to prepare them for life outside the classroom. We’re still imagining [these changes] It’s “adjustments,” Hart emphasizes, but we don’t need adjustments, we need radical restructuring.

joined dr. Hart also joined the student body the next day during church services. Students, staff, and faculty gathered to hear an abridged version of the previous night’s lecture. Hart explains the idea of ​​hyperindividualism in the role of white supremacy with the idea that Western ideas about individuals are naturally exclusionary. It also touches on the meaning of biblical freedom versus what society has conditioned as freedom and the way it separates us from those around us.

“What does it mean to be born into a world that already has patterns of sin?” asks Hart. He urges Christians to break free and stop perpetuating the world’s patterns, because all people are made in the image of God, and all are intertwined and interdependent in a way greater than individual realization.

Hart concludes the two speeches with an example from Martin Luther King, Jr. He tells the story of King in Birmingham, Alabama in 1963. An injunction was filed against the march, people were no longer mobilizing in such large numbers, and their bail fund was running out. They had to weigh the cost of sitting idly by against disobeying the order with dwindling funds. Hart tells us how King paused for a moment and then left the room. Upon his return, he donned blue jeans and a work shirt, to roll up his sleeves and get to work.

Hart calls on all people to follow in King’s footsteps by noting where injustices are today and identifying actionable steps for social change. It encourages everyone to look outside of themselves and see how interconnected everyone is in God’s love and mobilization. Finally, Hart invites all the people to put on their blue jeans, roll up their sleeves, and get to work.

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