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ESPN explains why the 49ers are unstoppable in a great clip

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San Francisco 49ers quarterback Brooke Purdy He has said before that his job is not that difficult, and that playing quarterback in the NFL is probably easier than playing in college.

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Kyle [Shanahan] It calls for a great game plan. I just have to go through my progress, and throw the checks over to Deebo [Samuel] And a Christian [McCaffrey]and make men miss, He said last week. “For me, that’s great. I just have to hand it out to the guys, and they come up with all the yards and stuff, and it’s fun to watch.”

At the risk of delivering too much from a single quote, this may be the most humbling streak in QB history. It may also be true.

Most quarterbacks feel rough about being called “Checkdown Charlie,” but at this rate Purdy might name his first-born Charles. Much has been said about exactly how Shanahan and the Niners thrived with Mr. Irrelevant at QB, however Whatever you make of Birdie’s physical abilitiesIt definitely works. In an illuminating 10-minute segment on Wednesday, ESPN provided a remarkably clear and concise (yes, succinct 10-minute) explanation of why.

The first half of the clip is compelling, but it’s not entirely necessary if you’re not a soccer fan. Former NFL quarterback Dan Orlovsky explains that Shanahan is basically able to disguise his intentions by trotting in the same formation with players lined up in different positions. He can do this because wide receiver Deebo Samuel is a reliable wide receiver, Christian McCaffrey is a reliable wide receiver, linebacker Kyle Juszczyk is a reliable slot receiver and so on down the depth chart.

But former NFL outfielders Ryan Clark and Marcus Spears had the simplest explanation for why this flexibility is so deadly. Why would you stay on Shell’s coverage against Christian McCaffrey? asked Orlovsky as an example of a starkly obvious mismatch. Short passes are easy to catch under coverage against the shell, and McCaffrey is dangerous in the open field. So why don’t defensemen see McCaffrey or Samuel lining up in an odd position and adapt accordingly? Clark knew exactly why.

“You just don’t adjust to who’s lining up,” said Clark, a longtime safety. “You adjust by formation,” he and Spears said at the same time. You’re probably aware of this and have never yelled at your TV when you see a hulking player covering the fastest player on the field, or a corner dangling from a running back. I did not!

And why does this work so well for Shanahan? “That’s the problem with the San Francisco 49ers. It’s not about getting people wide open,” Clark explained. “It’s bringing their people into face-to-face with someone who should bring them to the ground. It’s yards away. Distance.”.This forces weak corners to take McCaffrey down, or slower linebackers and linebackers to chase Debo.

Much of the football coverage on TV is, at best, painfully banal. Explaining what a cliche like “football without a position” means is a real feat.



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